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Black Bronco Foldaway Bush Hat

Black Bronco Foldaway Bush Hat

Brown Bronco Foldaway Bush Hat

Brown Bronco Foldaway Bush Hat

Sword of Richard The Lionheart S871

Sword of Richard The Lionheart S871


Richard was a king of England known as the Lion-Heart and famous for his exploits in the Third Crusade, although during his ten-year reign he spent only six months in England. He was born on 8 September 1157 in Oxford, son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He possessed considerable political and military ability. However, like his brothers, he cared nothing for his family, joining them in the great rebellion against their father in 1173. In 1183 his brother Henry died, leaving Richard heir to the throne. Henry II wanted to give Aquitaine to his youngest brother, John. Richard refused and, in 1189, joined forces with Philip II of France against his father, hounding him to a premature death in July 1189.

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Embossed Guitar Strap. (non-adjustable)

<span style='font-family: Times New Roman;'><h1>Embossed Guitar Strap. (non-adjustable)</h1></span>

33.95

This one piece strap is available in nine different colours and is11/2" X 55" in total length with a 3" wide suede lined shoulder pad. It has three button holes each end for adjustment. Same heavy embossed and shaded pattern as above strap.
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Mantle Clock

Mantle Clock

57.95

Fitted with a German Quartz mechanism and available with Roman or Arabic numerals.
Available in all colours listed below.
Approximate dimensions: 160mm x 150mm.
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Barometer/Thermometer/Hygrometer

Barometer/Thermometer/Hygrometer

71.95

Treble Martingale as; Barometer/Thermometer/Hygrometer.
Available in a choice of all colours listed below.
Approx dimensions: 37cm x 12cm

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To Calibrate your Barometer


To properly set your barometer you must disregard the words Stomy, Rain, Fair and Dry as these are only traditional zones on any barometer dial. The barometer dial indicator hand will never move all the way to Rain to predict rain or Stormy to predict bad weather. The normal range of movement for the indicating hand is from 29.5 to 30.6 inches. The most extreme readings will occur before a hurricane or a tornado when your barometer hand may drop as low as 28.5 inches or, at the other extreme, if very fair, dry weather is expected, your barometer may rise to as high as 30.9 inches.

Height Setting:
Barometers should be adjusted according to the altitude of their location which is a factor of variation. This can be done for instance by comparison with the town or local barometer. Setting is performed by turning the small brass screw at the back of the barometer, in the correct direction, until the black pointer reaches the division corresponding to the reading you have been given.

Warning:
Damage can be caused to the mechanism if adjustment screw is turned more than one whole turn either way. A quarter of a turn either way is usually enough to set the correct reading. (Please treat gently !).

To ensure the best results, the following procedure should be carried out every twelve hours (morning & evening).
1. Tap the face of the barometer to release any friction. This will show direction of any movement.
2. Adjust setting hand to a position over the indicating hand, this will give you a current reading. If it moves to the right, you have a rising barometer, which usually means a change for the better or continued good weather. If the hand moves to the left, you have a falling barometer which usually means a change for the worse. A steady hand means no change expected.

The correct barometric pressure reading for your area can be obtained from your local weather station, local air port/station or television forecast.

Please remember that readings given by your barometer indicate weather conditions approximately twenty-four to forty-eight hours in advance, provided that wind direction and velocity remain the same.



WORKING WITH LEATHER


PREPARING - TOOLS - DYES - FINISHING

PREPARING THE LEATHER
Leather will take up and hold an imprint only if it is damp. So, before work begins with any tools and before tracing on your design, you need to dampen the leather – ’CASE’ it is the proper term. Do this with water and a small piece of sponge. The sponge should be pretty damp but not wringing wet. Leave for a minute or so to allow the water to penetrate.
TOOLS
There are dozens of different metal stamps available from leather craft suppliers. These are also referred to as fancy punches and dies. They range from simple geometric ones to quite complex motif stamps that you can use singly or to make a panel of repeated pattern. Hit them with a mallet and work on leather dampened with water. You can even make your own simple stamps using small lengths of hardwood moulding. These stamps should last pretty well for a good few dozen imprints; then the edges will loose their sharpness.
DYES
Most of the leather dyes you can buy have a spirit base, are thin like water and soak into leather rapidly. They dry quickly to give permanent waterproof colours. Often they are sold as powders which need to be mixed with methylated spirit, otherwise they come in ready mixed bottles, with tight snap on or screw tops, for mixing or storing. The dyes will come with instructions on how to mix them up so scrutinise the details carefully. You can buy a good range of colours and most of them can be diluted to give lighter shades. Colours can also be mixed, but we find mixing more than two colours turns the dye muddy.
FELT TIP PENS
You can use these to draw quite intricate designs on hide bags, belts and straps etc. Strong, dark colours work best. Use spirit based markers if you want to put on a saddle soap finish, water based ones will smear. The chunky sort of permanent marker is also useful for colouring bevelled hide edges. Felt tips work equally well on light coloured suede and soft, matt grain leather. Some so-called permanent markers smudge if you get them wet, so again, experiment on scraps first.
FINISHING
When the leather dries it will probably look pretty dry and dull. That’s because the dye removes some of the natural oils in the leather. Don’t worry, you haven’t finished. You can rub the surface hard with a rag and produce a fair shine. Better still, feed the leather with saddle soap. This will enrich the colours and polish up to a beautiful sheen.
SADDLE SOAP
This is excellent stuff and we can’t recommend it enough. It imparts a smooth natural sheen to grain leather (not suede). There are products around which claim to give all kinds of wonderful gloss or lacquer finishes to leather, but for our money we’d rather stick to good old saddle soap. It helps to soften and clean leather, gives it a semi water resistant finish, is safe to use on dyed or untreated leather and you can often get it from shoe shops or hardware stores. Put it on a non-fluff cloth or your fingers and rub well in to bring up a shine. To smooth the fibres on the flesh side of the finished article. A wax polish can be applied sparingly.

Good luck!!

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